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Beady Eye – BE

Laura Lloyd

Triangle

Two years after the disappointing 2011 album, Different Gear, Still Speeding, which failed to arouse much attention, as it sounded more like old Oasis B-Sides than a fresh album from a newly-emerged band, Beady Eye have made a bold comeback with their second album BE, and it’s clear that frontman Liam Gallagher means business as he tries his best to shake off the ‘Oasis’ label and create his own, individual sound.

The first track, Flick of the Finger, opens with trumpets, a continuous drumbeat and heavy bass guitar backing, much different to cheerier tracks such as The Roller which featured on their first album. It’s made obvious within the first track that there are political undertones, pointing the finger towards revolution, inequality and war. It’s a strong and bold opening to any album, giving the listener a taster of what to expect as well as showing that the band, as a whole, have become more serious about their music.

Although the album starts quite sombre, the third track, Face the Crowd, is more uplifting, urging the listener to be whatever they want to be and to just go with the flow of life; a message that has run through a lot of old Oasis tracks. Second Bite of the Apple is another shining track with its smooth beat and use of trumpets making it catchy and a standout track from the whole album, as well as showing off the diversity that the band has now moulded into the creation of their music. However, Don’t Brother Me is softer with just Gallagher’s voice accompanied by an acoustic guitar – a rarity for this band. The song could be seen as an olive branch for brother Noel Gallagher as the line ‘give peace a chance, take my hand, be a man’ suggests some sort of white flag being waved between the two.

As a whole, the album is hard to fault and is much more listen worthy than the first album could ever be. However, instead of being reminiscent of past Oasis albums, this album is somehow different. It holds a more mature and diverse set of tracks. It no longer has rebellious, rock and roll, drug and alcohol infused lyrics and instead boasts catchy beats, brass bands and toned down guitars whilst still being modern and keeping the ‘edge’ that Liam Gallagher has always been known for. A bold and serious album showing that the band is back with force.

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